Top 50 Git commands developers should Know

top 50 git commands

As a developer, it’s essential to have a solid understanding of version control systems like Git. Git is a powerful tool that allows you to manage your code repositories, track changes to your code, and collaborate with your team.

If you’re new to Git or just looking to refresh your skills, it’s important to know the most commonly used Git commands. In this post, we’ll cover the top 50 Git commands that every developer should know. These commands will help you effectively manage your Git repositories and collaborate with your team.

Whether you’re just starting out with Git or you’re an experienced developer looking to brush up on your skills, this post is for you. Let’s dive in and take a look at the top 50 Git commands every developer should know.

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Git Commands and their uses.

  1. git init: Initializes a new Git repository.
  2. git clone: Makes a copy of an existing Git repository.
  3. git add: Adds a file to the staging area.
  4. git commit: Records changes to the repository.
  5. git push: Sends local commits to a remote repository.
  6. git pull: Fetches and merges changes from a remote repository.
  7. git branch: Lists, creates, or deletes branches.
  8. git checkout: Switches between branches or restores files.
  9. git merge: Merges branches together.
  10. git log: Shows a history of commits.
  11. git diff: Shows differences between commits, commit and working tree, etc.
  12. git show: Shows metadata and content changes of a specific commit.
  13. git tag: Tags a specific commit with a label.
  14. git fetch: Downloads commits, files, and refs from a remote repository.
  15. git gc: Cleans up unnecessary files and optimizes the local repository.
  16. git ls-files: Shows the files in the staging area and the working tree.
  17. git reset: Discards commits, moves the branch pointer, or restores files.
  18. git rm: Deletes a file from the staging area and the working tree.
  19. git mv: Moves or renames a file in the staging area and the working tree.
  20. git clean: Deletes untracked files from the working tree.
  21. git ls-remote: Lists references in a remote repository.
  22. git remote: Shows, adds, or removes a remote repository.
  23. git version: Shows the Git version.
  24. git config: Gets and sets repository or global options.
  25. git help: Shows the manual page for a command or a list of commands.
  26. git blame: Shows the commit and author responsible for each line in a file.
  27. git grep: Shows lines matching a pattern in the working tree or the index.
  28. git bisect: Finds the commit that introduced a bug by binary search.
  29. git shortlog: Shows a summary of commits grouped by author.
  30. git show-branch: Shows branches and their commits.
  31. git worktree: Manages multiple working trees for a single repository.
  32. git cherry-pick: Applies a commit from one branch to another.
  33. git rebase: Reapplies commits on top of another base tip.
  34. git describe: Shows a human-readable name for a commit.
  35. git submodule: Manages subdirectories that contain Git repositories.
  36. git filter-branch: Rewrites the commit history.
  37. git merge-base: Shows the best common ancestor(s) between two commits.
  38. git rev-list: Lists commits in a commit-graph.
  39. git rev-parse: Shows information about Git objects.
  40. git var: Shows internal Git variables.
  41. git am: Applies email patches from a mailbox.
  42. git apply: Applies a patch from a file.
  43. git archive: Creates a tar archive of the repository.
  44. git instaweb: Starts a web server for browsing the repository.
  45. git send-email: Sends patches as email messages.
  46. git request-pull: Generates a summary of pending changes.
  47. git daemon: Starts a Git server that serves repositories over Git://.
  48. git instaweb: Starts a web server for browsing the repository.
  49. git fast-export: Exports the commit history in a diff format.
  50. git stash: Temporarily saves changes that have not been committed.

Threats of incorrect git commands.

There are several potential threats of dealing with incorrect Git commands:

  1. Data loss: If you accidentally delete or modify important files in your repository, it may not be possible to recover them. This could result in the loss of valuable data, which could have serious consequences depending on the nature of the project you are working on.
  2. Repository corruption: Incorrectly using Git commands could potentially cause corruption in your repository, which could make it difficult or impossible to use. This could lead to delays in your project and potentially even the need to start over with a new repository.
  3. Security vulnerabilities: Incorrectly using Git commands could potentially expose security vulnerabilities in your repository. This could allow attackers to access sensitive data or inject malicious code into your project.
  4. Collaboration issues: If you use Git commands incorrectly when working with a team, it could lead to confusion and difficulties in collaboration. This could cause delays and potentially even conflicts between team members.

It’s important to be careful when using Git and to make sure that you understand the implications of each command before using it. If you are unsure about a particular command, it’s a good idea to do some research or ask for help from an experienced developer.

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Conclusion

In conclusion, mastering the top 50 Git commands is essential for any developer working on a software project. These commands will help you manage your Git repositories, track changes to your code, and collaborate with your team. Whether you are just starting out with Git or looking to refresh your skills, it’s important to have a solid understanding of these commands.

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Thank you for reading our post on the top 50 Git commands every developer should know. We hope you found it helpful and that it has given you a good foundation for working with Git. If you have any questions or would like to learn more about Git, please don’t hesitate to reach out.